Human Rights Organisation urges Iran to halt execution of man arrested at 17, sentenced in ‘grossly unfair trial

Typography
ArmanjpgAmnesty International is urging Iran halt the planned execution of a young man who was sentenced to death for a crime that took place when he was a child, following a grossly unfair trial marred by torture-tainted “confessions”.
Arman Abdolali was moved to solitary confinement in Raja’i Shahr prison in Karaj, west of Tehran, in preparation for his execution on Wednesday October 13. His execution was scheduled twice before – in July 2021 and in January 2020 – but was halted both times after an international outcry, Amnesty International said in a statement on October 11.
Diana Eltahawy, Amnesty’s deputy director for the Middle East and North Africa, called on the authorities to “immediately halt all plans” to execute Abdolali, saying the use of the death penalty against people who were under 18 at the time the crime was committed is prohibited under international law and constitutes an “abhorrent assault on child rights.”
Arman Abdolali was first sentenced to death in a grossly unfair trial in December 2015 after being convicted of murdering his girlfriend. The court relied on torture-tainted “confessions”, in connection with the disappearance of his girlfriend in 2014, according to Amnesty International.


The body of the girl was never found; the court stated that the murder had been committed without leaving any trace indicating that Arman Abdolali had attained “mental maturity” and understood the nature and consequences of the crime.
The sentence was upheld by the Supreme Court in July 2016. The trial and appeal verdicts both noted Arman Abdolali’s allegations that he was held in prolonged solitary confinement for 76 days and repeatedly beaten to “confess”, but no investigation was ordered and the “confessions” were described by the court as “unequivocal”, the rights group said.

In February 2020, the Supreme Court granted him a retrial in a case that largely focused on whether there were doubts about his “maturity” at the time of the crime.
At the retrial, the court ruled that his criminal responsibility stood in the absence of any evidence to determine his maturity so many years after the crime.

Diana Eltahawy, Amnesty’s deputy director for the Middle East and North Africa, called on the authorities to “immediately halt all plans” to execute Abdolali, saying the use of the death penalty against people who were under 18 at the time the crime was committed is prohibited under international law and constitutes an “abhorrent assault on child rights.”

Abdolali was sentenced to death in January 2020 and in July 2021, but his execution was stopped both times after an international outcry, according to Amnesty International.
“Global action helped to stop Arman Abdolali’s previously scheduled executions. We now urge the international community, including the UN and EU, to urgently intervene to save his life,” Eltahawy said.

“Given these deeply flawed proceedings, Amnesty International is also calling on the Iranian authorities to quash Arman Abdolali’s conviction and grant him a retrial in line with fair trial standards generally and those pertaining to children in particular,” the group said.

Under international laws guiding use of the death penalty, it’s illegal to execute someone who was under 18 when they allegedly committed the crime. Despite this, and despite Iran having ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child decades ago, the Iranian authorities continue to sentence juvenile offenders to death.
At least three men who were under the age of 18 at the time of their crimes have been executed so far in 2021.

Young people condemned to death in Iran spend an average of seven years on death row before being taken out of their cells to be hanged, though in some cases juvenile offenders have spent over a decade on death row.

In a number of cases the authorities have scheduled the executions of juvenile offenders and then postponed them at the last minute, adding to the mental and physical ordeal of imprisonment on death row – a practice that is cruel, inhuman and degrading.

ICFTO Newsletter

 

Contribution

Please consider supporting our efforts.

Amount

Online conference on Iran's 1988 massacre

Online conference on Iran's 1988 massacre

Ex-Tehran University President urges Iran’s youths to protest against dictatorship

Dr. Mohammad Maleki, the first Chancellor of the University of Tehran following the 1979 revolution and a former Iranian political prisoner, has from his home in Tehran sent a message to the youths in Iran to “rise up and protest” against the mullahs’ regime in Iran.

Maryam Rajavi's Speech at conference with British MPs

Iran regime broadcasts video to recruit children for Syria war

The Iranian regime, has embarked on a new propaganda campaign to encourage children to join the war in Syria.

Basiji

Iran regime airs propaganda clip to recruit Afghans to fight in Syria

Iran regime airs propaganda clip to recruit Afghans to fight in Syria

Maryam Rajavi meets UK Church Leaders

Maryam Rajavi meets with two UK Church leaders, Bishops John Pritchard & Adrian Newman

Priests Meet Maryam Rajavi